Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Lace Curtain Irish

It's Thursday, the day for everything vintage! Suzanne at Colorado Lady hosts Vintage Thingies Thursday each week; go check it out!
Have you ever heard the term "lace curtain Irish"? I always thought it meant a more middle-class Irish immigrant family,but I was wrong. Upon researching the term I learned it was a derogatory term used to describe families who thought they were better than other immigrants and put on "airs".I used the term for my post title because I am showing off some lace that I've had handed down to me from both my parents' Irish sides of the family. I don't think it's from Ireland, but it's definitely lace! The pictures should enlarge when clicked, for better viewing.In my research I learned that lace is made both by crocheting and a process called tatting. Tatting uses one or more shuttles or a shuttle and a ball to create the pattern. I'm pretty sure all of this lace is crocheted, because the tatted lace I found online was much more intricate.All of this lace is out and used in my house. I use this runner sometimes on the coffee table and sometimes the dining room, and the smaller pieces are under things that might scratch my antique tables.If you like lace, Hearts Desires is an online shop that sells both vintage and new lace products, as well as having tons of information on caring for your vintage linens and the history of linens. There is also The Lace Museum and Guild, whose mission is to preserve, exhibit and offer instruction about lace. Remember to visit Suzanne and the other VTT Participants!

26 comments:

Shelia said...

Evening, Dear One! Oh, how I love this crocheted pieces. I crochet myself and always appreciate seeing beautiful needlework. Hope all is well with you, Elizabeth.
Be a sweetie,
Shelia :)

bfs ~ "Mimi" said...

A lost art. Not many in newer generations know how to do this. Crazy thing is, my daughter does, but I don't.

Beautiful work! I know you enjoy it.

Jewelgirl said...

These are gorgeous! Can you imagine
the time that was put into each of
these laces pieces? They are treasures indeed! :) Jewelgirl

Bridget said...

I like that term "lace curtain Irish." I have Irish relatives and think that maybe some of them might fit that description. lol
I adore handwork, these pieces are a treasure.

Amy said...

Ivé never heard of that term but I love vintage lace and crochet, yours is pretty :-)

CC said...

I love your crocheted pieces..and I love to crochet. My mother and grandmother taught me all the needlearts..I can still do them all, except for tatting. I've forgotten how to tat, but it's so lovely and delicate. Happy VTT and have a lovely day.

Mamaoftwins said...

I love learning about old sayings and their meanings :)

These are beautiful. It has always amazed me how detailed these are. Such a work of art. :) Thanks for sharing

marian said...

WOW i lace all you lace treasures..i'll be def checking out the website :)

Ulla said...

Lovely crocheted lace! I just happened to post about bobbin lace today for VTT, it is another way of making lace.
I love the saying you explained!

Smilingsal said...

Johnny's Italian grandmother crocheted many doilies for her family. I have some treasure just like your bottom two pictures. Thanks for sharing.

Neabear said...

You have some wonderful crocheted treasures there!! Thanks for sharing.

Coloradolady said...

These are wonderful crocheted pieces. I love the unique feel of each one.

Mr. Linky was down...not my error..LOL. I linked you in for this week.

Have a great weekend.

~TAMY 3 Sides of Crazy~ said...

These are beautiful! I have a tote full of old linens I need to go through. I think you've inspired me to do so. Have a great day!

foxxy said...

I too have lace handmade from my mother. So much time went in to making those. Lovely!
Beca

Susan said...

Never heard that expression. But my mum was Irish and well I could see that being true of some.
Beautiful pieces you have and such a nice assortment of different patterns.

^..^ Corgi Dog Mama ^..^ said...

Wonderful and beautiful treasures. Love that term, Irish lace....so pretty to picture in your mind.

mannequin said...

Those are very pretty Elizabeth and incredibly, they have no stains all over them as mine do!

Grandmother made beautiful doilies, I remember my mother starching some of them. Today, I have one tattered set left..

Kelly said...

The lace is beautiful and I am so happy to hear that you love your things by using them. I use my treasures as well - I want to love them, and I want to share them with those I love. Thank you for sharing these precious pieces with us. ~Kelly

unDeniably Domestic

TattingChic said...

Lovely crochet!!!

Happy To Be said...

Elizabeth its all just lovely girl..and I'm irish..but don't know what kind of curtain I'm called ha ha !!! hugs and smiles Gloria

Helen said...

I remember my aunts talking about "tatting." I haven't heard the term in ages .... your photos are lovely.

Teeny Tiny cabin said...

Hello Elizabeth!
Lovely linens! The reserch was interesting and informative! It's just great that you use and appreciate these lovely handmade items--such a wonderful connection to the past!
Enjoyed--as always!
Blessings to you!
Claudia O.

Gina said...

Yes, these are all crocheted and lovely pieces. Tatting is another form of lacemaking but you can also knit lace, make bobbinlace or do various forms of needlelace. Crochet has more than one technique, like Irish crochet, filet crochet and Tunisian crochet. Bobblinlace has many forms too, often named after the place they were developed in (torchon, Bedfordshire, Chantilly). Needlelace too is named by origin and technique. The Lace Fairy dot com has tons of info on how to differentiate between them.

Mary said...

Beautiful lace items. When I hear the phrase 'Lace curtain Irish' I think that it means things may look great from the outside but on the inside things aren't so great.

Angie said...

I love lace. I need to find more creative ways to use doilies and such. I always see ideas and then I forget to use them :)

Lisa said...

I love how it looks on the table.